But the idea that a site facilitating risky sex doesn’t allow its members to police themselves is unnerving

But the idea that a site facilitating risky sex doesn’t allow its members to police themselves is unnerving

But before any of their more expensive efforts, Twitter and Facebook allowed users to call out others for bullying, slurs and death threats. That has resulted in prosecutions that are themselves complicated, but which may help make online life more civil. The inability to name abusers on FetLife, even pseudonymously, deepens the faceless distance that breeds online abuse. It also robs FetLife, and the online BDSM community more generally, of the self-policing and communication that are crucial to safety. Exploring BDSM through a screen is attractive to less-savvy acolytes-but anonymity is also like oxygen for the bad actors likely to prey on them.

Community members have attempted to compensate for FetLife’s failings, launching an add-on tool called the Fetlife Alleged Abusers Database Engine, or FAADE, which both maintains a database of allegations and scans user’s profile pictures against the United States Sex Offender Registry

Fifty Shades of Grey may also make its converts even more vulnerable because, as Emma Green recently wrote in The Atlantic, its depiction is overwhelmingly nonconsensual.

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